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NEWS

What’s Happening

 

Columbus Museum Of Art, Classical 101 Commemorate Harlem Renaissance Centennial

January 8, 2019

The concert program by the same name features clarinetist Antoine T. Clark, flutist Dennis Carter, pianist Caroline B. Salido-Barta and narrator Herbert Woodward Martin. In addition to performing, Clark is the creator and organizer of the musical portion of this event and provided program notes.

2018 Colour of Music Festival Announced For October 24-27

10/15/2018

“Presenting black classically trained musicians in chamber settings on Charleston’s high battery showcases the many facets of this Festival. What attendees will see and hear this year is Charleston’s classical music history coming full-circle with world-class musicians performing the original versions of what we call classical music,” said Lee Pringle, Founder and Artistic Director.

“Having the opportunity to conduct and lead world-class musicians and present historic music from the Baroque to early classical period in such a historic and charming city is among my career highlights,” says, Antoine T. Clark, Guest Conductor.

ONU WIND ORCHESTRA PRESENTS ‘AN AMERICAN TRIBUTE’

10/15/2018

The Ohio Northern University Wind Orchestra will present “An American Tribute” at 4 p.m. on Oct. 21 in the Freed Center for the Performing Arts. Director Antoine T. Clark will conduct the program, which will feature works by George Gershwin, Samuel Barber, Aaron Copland and Leonard Bernstein.

Aug. 25 marked the 100th anniversary of the birth of Bernstein. Accordingly, music organizations and institutions across the nation and the world are honoring this great conductor, composer, music educator and pianist by programming his works throughout the year. Ohio Northern’s Wind Orchestra will honor Bernstein’s musical legacy by performing his music and music of composers whom he championed.

Bernstein captured the heart of a nation when he, as a 25-year-old assistant conductor with the New York Philharmonic, filled in on short notice for an ailing Bruno Walter, who was slated to guest conduct the New York Philharmonic on Nov. 14, 1943. Bernstein became an overnight sensation after that fateful evening, since that concert was nationally broadcast on CBS Radio. His life and musical legacy have inspired many and shaped the cultural landscape of a nation.

Ohio Northern’s Wind Orchestra acquires new director

08/29/2018

Ohio Northern University’s Wind Orchestra has a new director, Dr. Antoine Clark, who has taken the place of Dr. Thomas Hunt who retired at the end of the Spring 2018 semester.

Dr. Clark has an outstanding history in the musical field. He earned his Bachelor’s of Music in Music Education from Virginia Commonwealth University. He holds a Master of Music degree in clarinet performance from the University of Cincinnati-College Conservatory of Music. Dr. Clark later earned the Master of Music in Orchestral Conducting and the Doctor of Musical Arts in Clarinet performance at The Ohio State University.


Dr. Clark was aware of ONU’s reputation for education and the Music Department wonderful work of preparing students for musical careers.

“For many years, I have been aware of Ohio Northern University's fine reputation as an educational institution and the wonderful work that the Music Department has been doing in preparing students for careers in music. The faculty in the Music Department are well known throughout the state, region, and nation for their expertise. Therefore, I am thrilled to take on the position as the new director of the wind orchestra while working alongside talented students and faculty,” Dr. Clark said.

Locally renowned clarinetist to show off broad range of music

October 29, 2017

Adjunct Instructor of Music Antoine Clark’s first recital on the Hill in eight years will include a diverse repertoire of 19th and 20th century composers such as Leó Weiner, Bohuslav Martinů, Louis Spohr and Ralph Vaughan Williams.

Conductor Antoine Clark’s love of classical music distinct for a few reasons

11/19/2016

Antoine Clark certainly wasn’t the first child to be captivated by classical music. But his race and his place - an African-American growing up in a working-class family in rural Virginia - meant that he was the only one around at the time. More than a quarter-century later, Clark stood in front of the McConnell Arts Center Chamber Orchestra on a recent Sunday.

The African-American Conductor: James DePreist

04/20/2016

The wonderful Antoine Clark is a Columbus based clarinetist, teacher and conductor. Antoine recently took some time out of a ferociously busy schedule to help me with a series of podcasts on African-American conductors.

Elsewhere on this blog, you'll find our profiles of Thomas Wilkins, Henry Lewis, and Dean Dixon. Oh! And not forgetting, Antoine is the Founder and Music Director of the McConnell Arts Center Chamber Orchestra.


Now we discuss James DePreist. Born in Philadelphia in 1936, DePreist won the Dmitri Mitropoulos conducting competition while still a young man. He served as Leonard Bernstein's assistant at the New York Philharmonic. Over a long career, DePreist was music director of the National Symphony, the Monte Carlo Orchestra, and most notably enjoyed a long tenure with the Oregon Symphony. In 2005 he was awarded the National Medal of the arts by President George W. Bush.

James DePreist died in 2012.

African-American Conductors Podcast: Thomas Wilkins

03/15/2016

Here's another in a series of podcasts on the lives and careers of African-American conductors. 

My collaborator in this project is a young man called Antoine Clark. We're a bit late with this next installment, for all the right reasons. Antoine is ferociously busy as a conductor, working with his own orchestra, the McConnell Arts Center Chamber Orchestra.

When not conducting there, he is doing guest appearances, he is teaching, he is an orchestra and chamber musician and is juggling phone calls from irritating radio producers about working on a podcast project

It was Antoine who reminded me of Thomas Wilkins. I should not have needed reminding.

Maestro Wilkins has been a welcome guest with the Columbus symphony.

Thomas Wilkins, born in Virginia, has served as music director of the Oregon Symphony and the Hollywood Bowl, and continues as Germershausen Conductor of the Boston Symphony Youth and Family Concerts.

Maestro Wilkins tell us "Music is greater than we are". You'll hear more comments from him, plus Antoine Clarks's perspective and musical examples, in this podcast tribute to Thomas Wilkins., Enjoy.

Celebrating the African-American Conductor Henry Lewis

02/10/2016

Continuing our series of podcasts on the African American conductor, I've asked Columbus based conductor Antoine Clark to join me in talking about Henry Lewis (1932-1996).

Columbus musician Antoine Clark discusses the life and music of African-American conductor Henry Lewis.

Henry Lewis was born in California. Trained on the double bass, Lewis formed the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and conducted for the U.S. Army in Europe in the 1950s. Henry Lewis became Music Director of the New Jersey Symphony in 19868, soon elevating a community based orchestra into the big leagues.

Lewis made his debut at the Metropolitan Opera  on October 16, 1972, conducting La boheme.  He led 138 performances at the Met, including productions of Carmen and Le Prophete starring his wife, mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne, whom he married in 1960. The couple divorced in 1979.  Other Met assignments were Romeo et Juliette and Un ballo in maschera.

Henry Lewis went on to conduct the Netherlands Radio Symphony as Principal Conductor, and continued to appear internationally until shortly before his death in 1996.

Our podcast tribute to Henry Lewis includes excerpts from his recording of Richard Strauss's Don Juan, his 1976 television special for the BBC, and a 1991 performance of Rossini's Semiramide in Venice.

Celebrating the African-American Conductor: Dean Dixon

02/03/2016

I've asked Columbus based conductor Antoine Clark to join me for a series of conversations about African-American conductors. Antoine is finishing a masters at OSU, and is the founder and music director of the McConnell Arts Center Chamber Orchestra.
 
The classical music world is slowly becoming less color blind as far as maestri are concerned, but there is work to do. 

Our talks begin with Dean Dixon (1915-1976). Dixon was a New Yorker who trained at Juilliard and Columbia University. He formed three orchestras on his own in New York, and took them to Town Hall and Carnegie Hall. His successes came to the attention of Eleanor Roosevelt, who wrote about Dixon in her syndicated  newspaper column, My Day, and who attended his concerts. Dates followed conducting the New York Philharmonic and the NBC Symphony.

But Dixon's career was largely European based. He returned to New York for conducting dates in 1970, and died six years later. There's a new biography of this break through talent, Dean Dixon: Negro at Home, Maestro Abroad by Rufus Jones, Jr.